Permanent Collection - Natural History Museum

# Two world-famous habitat halls show African and North American mammals in their natural environments.

# The Museum is home to Megamouth, the world's rarest shark — a 14.5 foot long male that was the first to be placed on public view. Only 17 of the elusive sharks have been found since the first one was discovered in 1976.

# Dinosaurs, the perennial natural history museum favorite, are well represented here. Dinosaur exhibits include a cast of the complete skeleton of a Mamenchisaurus, the largest-necked dinosaur ever discovered, one of the few and finest Tyrannosaurus rex skulls on view anywhere, and dramatic models of an Allosaurs and Carnotaurus by sculptor/paleontologist Stephen Czerkas.

# Animated birds, tree walk-through habitats and 27 separate learning stations are featured in the popular Schreiber Hall of Birds.

# A unique exhibit, "Chaparral: A Story of Life from Fire," demonstrates fire's importance in the life cycle of chaparral through a multi-media presentation that surrounds the visitor with the sights, sounds and even the smells of a chaparral ecosystem.

# The Marine Hall features intricate dioramas of sea life in California waters, from the inter tidal to the deep sea. Identifications of many of the animals and plants seen by beachcombers and scuba divers are provided.

# More than 2,000 gem and mineral specimens are on view in the Gem and Mineral Hall. The hall features one of the largest gold exhibits in the world, that includes over 300 pounds of natural gold along with gold mining artifacts and other memorabilia. The walk-through Hixon Gem Vault houses such spectacular treasures as exquisite star rubies, emeralds and sapphires.

# In the Ralph M. Parsons Discovery Center – set to re-open in its new home on the Ground Floor of the Museum this Spring – offers families a myriad of hands-on activities. Children of all ages can take fossil rubbings from a realistic-looking rock wall; look at water drops under a microscope; check out "discovery boxes" full of educational activities; observe live animals such as snakes, fish and lizards; or get a closer look at a stuffed lion, tiger and bear.

# Ancient Latin America - The Ancient Latin America Hall covers an array of prehistoric societies of Latin America, including the Maya, Aztec, Inca, and many other cultural groups. Ceramic vessels, figurines, personal adornment items and other artifacts from Mexico, Central, and South America are on permanent display in this hall located on the first floor.

# Zuni Fetishes - The exhibit case that features 99 carvings of the 3,951 fetish carvings donated by Dr. and Mrs. Boyd W. Walker in 1997 reflect the dynamic and diverse artistic skills of Native American peoples of the American Southwest who have carved small animals from stone and shell since ancient times. The portion of the entire collection on display is in the east stairwell between the first and second floors.

# Lando Hall of California History - This exhibition spans the Southwest from the 1500's through time and place to downtown Los Angeles in 1940. The gallery is organized chronologically and features twelve themes: Native Americans, New World Exploration, Spanish Outpost, International Competition, Mexican Territory, War with the U.S., 31st State, Craftsman Style, Agriculture, Land, Sea & Air, Motion Pictures, City of Los Angeles. In this hall the history of the past appears in both artifacts and the records of the people who lived there.

# The 2001 Docent Quilt has been affectionately created and donated to the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County by the Docent Roundtable. Inspired in part by the quilts in Roland's Freeman's "Communion of the Spirits" exhibition (on display from March 18, 2001 to September 3, 2001) and by the Montclair (New Jersey) Craft Guild quilt, the 2001 Docent Quilt honors the Museum President and Director, Dr. James L. Powell, on the occasion of his retirement, and welcomes Dr. Jane Pisano as his successor.




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