London

United Kingdom



Address:
Exhibition Road, South Kensington

SW7 2DD
Phone: +44 (0)870 870 4868
Website: http://www.sciencemuseum.

Science Museum

The origins of the Science Museum lie in the nineteenth-century movement to improve scientific and technical education. Prince Albert was a leading figure in this movement, and he was primarily responsible for the Great Exhibition of 1851 to promote the achievements of science and technology. The profits of the hugely successful Exhibition were used to purchase land in South Kensington to establish institutions devoted to the promotion and improvement of industrial technology. At the same time, the Government set up a Science & Art Department which established the South Kensington Museum in 1857, from which the Science Museum and Victoria & Albert Museum have developed.

The objects on display in the South Kensington Museum were drawn from various sources including the Great Exhibition. Most were art objects, but the 'science collections', as they were known, included models, apparatus, examples of materials, books and educational resources. The collections were boosted by an international exhibition in 1876 of scientific instruments. In 1884 the Patent Museum passed on its stock of patent models to the science collections, including priceless objects such as Stephenson's 'Rocket' and Arkwright's original textile machinery. The arts and science collections gradually assumed their own identities to the extent that the Science Museum and the Victoria & Albert Museum were formally separated in 1909. A new building to house the Science Museum was formally opened by King George V in 1928. The Museum continued to expand its premises and its collections. In the early 1980s, objects from the Wellcome collection were placed on permanent display. [ Read all ]


Permanent Collection

The Science Museum has over 300,000 objects in its care, covering the entire history of western science, technology and medicine.

It has been uniquely placed to acquire objects recording the Industrial Revolution, and now holds unrivalled collections in this area. Medical artefacts from all periods and cultures also form an important part of its holdings.

For a history of the collections please see, http://www.sciencemuseum.org.uk/collections/about/history.asp

Ingenious is a new website with over 30,000 museum images making connections between people, innovations and ideas. http://www.ingenious.org.uk/


Exhibitions

Maurice Broomfield’s ‘New Look’ at Industry: photographs from post-war Britain
21 February – 6 May 2007.

A stunning exhibition of photographs demonstrating a proudly modern vision of Britain at work in the 1950s and 1960s.


The Science of Spying
Until 2 September 2007.

Find out if you've got what it takes to be a modern-day spy in this new interactive family exhibition.

Game On
Until 25 February 2007.

Explore the history, technology and culture of computer games in this new special exhibition. From the PDP-1 of the 1960s to the latest consoles, Game On examines the technologies that have revolutionised the gaming world.

This exhibition is sponsored by Nintendo and organised and toured by Barbican Art Gallery, London.

NEURObotics...the future of thinking?
What might the future hold for your brain? Come and find out in the latest Antenna feature exhibition. Explore how medical technology could soon be used to enhance our brains and maybe even monitor our deepest thoughts. But should scientists be allowed to mess with our minds?

Inside the Spitfire
Until December 2007.

A spectacular view of the most famous British fighter plane of the Second World War stripped down to its original structure and deconstructed to reveal the complexity inside.





There are a number of online exhibitions, to view these please see, http://www.sciencemuseum.org.uk/exhibitions/exhibitions.asp+ [ Read all ]


Previous Exhibitions

Pixar: 20 Years of Animation
From rough sketches to finished films, Pixar: 20 Years of Animation takes you behind the scenes to discover the science and magic that created some of the most popular films ever made.

Pure Iceland
Exploring the diversity in the enviromnent in Iceland.

Building to the Limits
An exhbition showing how building specialists working together to create buildings that are safer, smarter, greener and more eye-catching than ever before


Exhibitions (5)

Click on the images to enlarge





Cost

Admission is now free but charges still apply for the IMAX 3D Cinema, simulators as well as for some of our special exhibitions.
Advanced tickets can be purchased on 0870 870 4868 (booking fee applies) or at any sales desk inside the Museum either before or on the day of your visit, however, during busy periods attractions may sell out very early in the day. Discounted family, group and combination tickets are available - please call or ask on arrival for details. Tickets for our Game On exhibition can also be pre-booked online.

Click on a heading to find out more, including current schedules.


Game On exhibition Price
adult £8.50
child/concession £6.50
family (1 adult, 2 children) £19.50
family (2 adults, 2 children) £26.00
Game On & IMAX 3D Cinema Price
adult £14.50
child/concession £11.50
family (1 adult, 2 children) £36.00
family (2 adults, 2 children) £49.00
IMAX® 3D Cinema Price
adult £7.50
child/concession £6.00
family (1 adult, 2 children) £18.00
family (2 adults, 2 children) £24.00
The Polar Express 3D Price
adult £10.00
child/concession £8.00
family (1 adult, 2 children) £24.50
family (2 adults, 2 children) £33.00
SimEx Simulator Ride Price
adult £4.00
child/concession £3.00
IMAX 3D Cinema & SimEx Price
adult £10.00
child/concession £8.00
Motionride Simulator Price
adult £2.50
child/concession £1.50
Museum Guidebooks Price
Science Museum Guide
£2.00



Concessions: Senior Citizens (Persons 60 or over), Children 16 and under, registered disabled and unemployed+ [ Read all ]


Opening hours

We are open seven days a week, from 10.00 to 18.00. The Museum is closed from 24 to 26 December.


Getting there

Nearest Tube Station
South Kensington
Buses
9, 10, 14, 49, 52, 70, 74, 345, 360, 414, C1

Exhibition Road
South Kensington
London
SW7 2DD
United Kingdom


Facilities

There are disabled facilities and entrances, toilets, a shop and cafe, cloakroom, induction loops, first aid and telephone all available. For more information please visit, http://www.sciencemuseum.org.uk/visitors/specialneeds.asp


Museum internal and external photos (2)

Click on the images to enlarge



News and events

The Spring 2007 Science Night Season is now fully booked.
If you would like to be one of the first to know the Summer 2007 dates please subscribe to our Science Night e-newsletter.

To join simply email us with the word subscribe in the subject line to science.night@sciencemuseum.org.uk. Alternatively you can call 020 7942 4747 and leave your postal address and we will send you out the Summer 2007 dates when they are released.


Education

There is a wealth of educational programs for schools and families. To learn more about what we offer please see,

http://www.sciencemuseum.org.uk/education/index.asp

Our website also contains information for teachers to help plan their visit.


Schools

Find out about the fantastic shows and workshops that the Science Museum can bring to your school, community venue or festival. Please see, http://www.sciencemuseum.org.uk/learning/outreach/index.asp


Families

Look no further for fun science activities to do at home, fantastic family events in the Museum during school holidays and info about our popular Science Night sleepovers.


Sponsorship

The Science Museum has an ambitious 10-year plan to create The Museum of the Future – a world-class presentation of the past, present and future of science, technology and medicine.

Help us to see further into the future…
Your donations will help us to transform more of the museum, more quickly. The more you're able to give, the faster and further we'll go.

If you're visiting, don't forget to make a donation at one of our donation boxes. Or better still, donate online - it's safe, quick and easy. All donations make a difference.