Selected works by Makiko Kudo

Makiko Kudo
Stage Curtain

2011

Oil on canvas

194.5 x 259.2 cm
Makiko Kudo
Floating Island

2012

Oil on canvas

227 x 364.6 cm
Makiko Kudo
Burning Red

2012

Oil on canvas

181.5 x 227 cm
Makiko Kudo
Gray Town

2011

Oil on canvas

227.5 x 365 cm
Makiko Kudo
I See Season

2010

Oil on canvas

259.5 x 389 cm
Makiko Kudo
Invisible

2011

Oil on canvas

182.0 x 227.5 cm

Articles

ART REVIEW: MAKIKO KUDO AT MARC FOXX
Jan 2011, by David Pagel, Los Angeles Times

Makiko Kudo’s hauntingly beautiful paintings chart a quietly charged course between loveliness and loneliness. At Marc Foxx, the Tokyo-based 32-year-old’s oils on canvas evoke bittersweet memories of bygone days, giving visitors to revisit childhood without turning into a sappy cliché .
Part f the power of Kudo’s images derives from their formal toughness, compositional savvy and spot-on paint handling. Two 12-feet-long paintings, “Missing” and “Manager of The End of the World”, make you think of Monet’s gorgeous water lilies and Rousseau’s dreamy realism without forcing the comparisons ort getting bogged down in portent. Similarly, Matisse’s Fauvist phase burbles into consciousness when you stand before “Insomnia,” the show’s serene knockout.

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Source: latimesblog.latimes.com


MAKIKO KUDO- ANDERSON’S CONTEMPORARY


Andersen’s Contemporary is currently showing a solo exhibition with new paintings by Japanese artist Makiko Kudo.

Makiko Kudo’s work depicts familiar motives in imaginary scenes. She paints houses, trees and people, but she paints them in such a way, that the immediately recognisable is merged with something mysterious, enigmatic and dreamy. This fusion of the realistic and the suggestive results in Kudo’s scenes appearing as if detached from time and space- concurrently universal and intimate; and a major inspiration for Kudo is indeed her own dreams, memories and emotions.

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Source: kopenhagen.dk


MAKIKO KUDO
Sept 2007, by Donald Eubank, The Japan Times Online

Twenty years from now, when we can look back on the trend toward the immature in Japanese art, we'll finally be able to shake out the worthy from the wearying. Ten or 20 canvases will stand the test of time, while the rest can be forgotten. To see one that's probably built to last, check out Makiko Kudo's current exhibition at the Tomio Koyama Gallery (www.tomiokoyamagallery.com) in Kiyosumi. Not everything clearly jumps out here, but "Since I Can See the World" (above) makes a fine argument for longevity. The childlike subject of a girl is expressive, while the brush strokes and composition are what they call "painterly" — that is, in a conversation with the history of the art form. Ask yourself if the rest will last as well. And if you make it to Kiyosumi by Saturday, check out Hiromi Yoshii gallery's extra space on the first floor of the complex for some humorous videos by Hiroki Kehara. They are the human equivalent of artist Koki Tanaka's popular short films about objects.

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Source: japantimes.co.jp