ARTIST:

Quentin Curry

Quentin Curry
Available, 2005
oil and stone dust on panel
182.9 x 244.8cm

Quentin Curry describes his work as “exploring the personal epic through painting”. Curry`s large-scale landscapes visually narrate scenes from everyday life, suggesting a poetic transience where reality and imagination interpenetrate, creating sublime moments of self-realisation or affirmation. Rendered with a broody, yet unmuddled palette, Curry’s paintings of the exterior world become open metaphors for interior projection and contemplation; his images of industrial wasteland, a waterfall, or a simple view through a window imbue the humble and forlorn with a quiet, rarefied beauty. Curry evokes the layered perceptions of his work through a unique painting process of mixing stone dust with enamel paint. Covering the surface of his canvas with a ‘screen’ of porous fabric, Curry applies the paint in thick impasto and then peels the fabric away, leaving a heavily textured image where the paint has been 'pressed' through the holes. Building up his images through a process of adding and removing these layers, Curry¹s images gain a pixelated effect conjuring both the virtuality of digitised media and the weathered look of ancient frescoes. Through his distinctive aesthetic, Curry’s introspective paintings describe contemporary experience with a timeless spirituality; his surfaces transforming into figurative microcosms, with each tiny dot becoming a diffused entity both isolated and compounded within the whole. In the vein of traditional American landscape painters such as Thomas Cole or Frederick Church, the heightened expanses of Curry’s tableaux convey a sensibility of Milton Avery. Curry endows the modern landscape with a similar awe and solitude, evoking a sense of discovery and promise with an eloquent poignancy.

Quentin Curry
New York Riches, 2005
oil and stone dust on panel
203 x 152cm

Quentin Curry describes his work as “exploring the personal epic through painting”. Curry`s large-scale landscapes visually narrate scenes from everyday life, suggesting a poetic transience where reality and imagination interpenetrate, creating sublime moments of self-realisation or affirmation. Rendered with a broody, yet unmuddled palette, Curry’s paintings of the exterior world become open metaphors for interior projection and contemplation; his images of industrial wasteland, a waterfall, or a simple view through a window imbue the humble and forlorn with a quiet, rarefied beauty. Curry evokes the layered perceptions of his work through a unique painting process of mixing stone dust with enamel paint. Covering the surface of his canvas with a ‘screen’ of porous fabric, Curry applies the paint in thick impasto and then peels the fabric away, leaving a heavily textured image where the paint has been 'pressed' through the holes. Building up his images through a process of adding and removing these layers, Curry¹s images gain a pixelated effect conjuring both the virtuality of digitised media and the weathered look of ancient frescoes. Through his distinctive aesthetic, Curry’s introspective paintings describe contemporary experience with a timeless spirituality; his surfaces transforming into figurative microcosms, with each tiny dot becoming a diffused entity both isolated and compounded within the whole. In the vein of traditional American landscape painters such as Thomas Cole or Frederick Church, the heightened expanses of Curry’s tableaux convey a sensibility of Milton Avery. Curry endows the modern landscape with a similar awe and solitude, evoking a sense of discovery and promise with an eloquent poignancy.

Quentin Curry
Vision Quest, 2005
oil and stone dust on panel
183 x 203cm

Quentin Curry describes his work as “exploring the personal epic through painting”. Curry`s large-scale landscapes visually narrate scenes from everyday life, suggesting a poetic transience where reality and imagination interpenetrate, creating sublime moments of self-realisation or affirmation. Rendered with a broody, yet unmuddled palette, Curry’s paintings of the exterior world become open metaphors for interior projection and contemplation; his images of industrial wasteland, a waterfall, or a simple view through a window imbue the humble and forlorn with a quiet, rarefied beauty. Curry evokes the layered perceptions of his work through a unique painting process of mixing stone dust with enamel paint. Covering the surface of his canvas with a ‘screen’ of porous fabric, Curry applies the paint in thick impasto and then peels the fabric away, leaving a heavily textured image where the paint has been 'pressed' through the holes. Building up his images through a process of adding and removing these layers, Curry¹s images gain a pixelated effect conjuring both the virtuality of digitised media and the weathered look of ancient frescoes. Through his distinctive aesthetic, Curry’s introspective paintings describe contemporary experience with a timeless spirituality; his surfaces transforming into figurative microcosms, with each tiny dot becoming a diffused entity both isolated and compounded within the whole. In the vein of traditional American landscape painters such as Thomas Cole or Frederick Church, the heightened expanses of Curry’s tableaux convey a sensibility of Milton Avery. Curry endows the modern landscape with a similar awe and solitude, evoking a sense of discovery and promise with an eloquent poignancy.

Quentin Curry
Bello Falls, 2005
oil and stone dust on panel
121.9 x 91.4cm

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Thursday, 26 November 2020: COVID-19 / CORONAVIRUS UPDATE:

Following the UK Government’s latest announcement placing London in Tier 2, Saatchi Gallery will re-open from Wednesday, 9 December 2020. We will re-open with our free entry Ground Floor exhibitions (Philip Colbert: Lobsteropolis and Antisocial Isolation) from December 9. The new dates for our next headline exhibition JR: Chronicles will be announced shortly.

Government guidelines on health and safety measures will remain in effect, including social distancing within a one-way system in our galleries, the provision of hand sanitising stations, and the wearing of face coverings by visitors and staff. All visitors are encouraged to pre-book their tickets prior to entry.

We look forward to welcoming you back soon.