ARTIST:

Thomas Scheibitz

Thomas Scheibitz
Untitled, 2002
Oil on canvas
205 x 281cm

In Untitled Thomas Scheibitz deconstructs a suburb in all its prefab glory. Breaking his painting down into compartmentalised units of colour, the effect is far more sophisticated than folksy faux naïveté: he uses painting as the human equivalent of digital compression.

Stripped of all extraneous detail, he renders the scene as pure codified information. Thomas Scheibitz doesn’t offer a representation of reality, rather, a universally recognisable idea of it, reassembled into digestible shapes and hues.

Thomas Scheibitz
Skilift, 1999
Oil on canvas
220 x 150cm

Skilift boasts a Cezanne-like mountain as if it were captured straight from cyberspace, the glass-panelled lodge as unnatural as a spaceship. There’s nothing clean or precious in the way Thomas Scheibitz renders his subjects: painterly gestures and drips are used to create mirage-like effects. The paintings revel in illusion over representation, not symbolising ‘subject’ but pure desire.

Thomas Scheibitz
Rosenweg, 1999
Oil on canvas
200 x 270cm

In Rosenweg Thomas Scheibitz doesn’t paint a subject, but offers a panoptic view as a solidified whole. Adopting the flatness of medieval painting, perspective is delineated through overlapping layers and scale. Flower, building and mountain integrate as an abridged version of space, a synopsis of grandeur.

Thomas Scheibitz presents the sublime as an algorithmic formula: mysticism denuded into a composite of shapes and patterns. A super-modern reinvention of the romantic landscape, Thomas Scheibitz creates a sense of awe not in the picture itself, but in the graphic simplicity with which such an overwhelming concept is inferred.

Thomas Scheibitz
Untitled No. 242, 1998
Oil on Canvas
142 x 106cm

In Thomas Scheibitz’s world of synthetic replication and commodity signifiers, even people are reduced to ideologically pragmatic form. Sparingly represented as flat cap and box ears, this figure meets all the requirements for the role of ‘sad professor’.

Thomas Scheibitz renders personal intimacy as a function of caricature, where visual description is inextricably entwined with stereotype and expectation. Through his simplified portrait, Thomas Scheibitz doesn’t proffer dehumanisation, but a super-race streamlined for instant identification and hypothetical interaction.

Thomas Scheibitz
Anlage, 2000
Oil on canvas
200 x 270cm

In Anlage, Thomas Scheibitz’s shapes and lines compete for visual prominence. Through maze-like composition, he creates an architecture of illusion where depth, height and perspective are implied through planes which make no attempt to conceal their flatness. He uses an intricate system of overlapping to create spaces within spaces.

Drawing reference from artists such as Joseph Albers, Thomas Scheibitz adapts the Utopian principles of Bauhaus and constructivism in a contemporary way. Subtlety of colour and sophistication of design imbue his composition with functionality: of aerial photography or engineering blueprint. Through abstraction, Scheibitz dissects the virtual infinity of space and replicates its subliminal nature as two dimensional paradox.

Thomas Scheibitz
Brillux, 1999
Oil on canvas
200 x 150cm

Working in both painting and sculpture, Scheibitz's reference points are often architectural. His organic forms and sharp angles smack of high design. Suggestions of location are found in patches of shrubbery green or sky blue. Working in washed-out pastel colours, his paintings seem to have faded through continuous exposure to the California sun.

Thomas Scheibitz
Douglas, 1999
Oil on canvas
229 x 150cm

Working from found media images, Scheibitz takes his subject matter from the empty and idealistic scenes of consumer culture. Deconstructing the original images into abstracted components, Scheibitz's paintings become design-oriented simulacra: architectural blueprints for themselves. In Douglas, Scheibitz paints a kaleidoscopic distortion of suburban pleasantness, a kind of twenty-first century cubism that references virtual reality as much as painting

Thomas Scheibitz
Funny Game, 2000
Oil and marker pen on canvas
200 x 150cm

Often working from doodle-like sketches, Scheibitz carefully maps out his compositions to create an order in space that seems both mechanical and biotic. Funny Game I is less an abstraction than an inkling of an abstraction in the making: thin washes create a dreamy sense of movement, a noncommittal translucent ground that evades concrete form. Exposing the process of artistic invention, he offers the viewer only fragmented suggestions, in which logical patterns or an insinuated subject might appear.
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